Grievances Against the King – Then and Now


A new Rassmussen survey – the best in the business – shows that 70% of Americans still believe that:

“…governments derive their only just powers from the consent of the governed.”

Well, that’s good, I guess.

But wait…that means 30% of people DON’T agree with it!

Anybody sense a problem here? I do. I smell a big fat stinky rat. And the rat has a donkey branded on its side.

Since yesterday was July 4, I took a few minutes and read the Declaration of Independence. I was struck by how the grievances against King George compare to what we have now.

      He created laws and disallowed laws at will
      He imposed taxes at will
      Made the Colonial government meet in places that were uncomfortable as a form of punishment
      Refused to allow laws passed in the colonies as a means of punishment and control

There are a bunch of grievances, and most of them are about the King asserting laws that colonists didn’t want, disallowing those they did, and confiscating or taxing wealth in one way or another.

Bump that up against:

      Using coercive power of government to confiscate private property
      Circumventing Congress and creating law by fiat
      Crippling private enterprise with unconstitutional regulations
      Assaulting future generations with unmanageable debt

I’d say our current government gives old George a run for his money.

There are even a few grievances that match our current list nicely. How about these taken from the Declaration:

“For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent”
“He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harrass our people, and eat out their substance.”
“He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries.”

We could do this all day long. But the point is, we need to step back and look at where we are and how we got here.

I think a big culprit is the fact that 30% of Americans don’t think the government gets its authority from the People.

Get this – in 2008 only 56% of people believed this!

And we come full circle.

Until we re-acquaint our fellow citizens with what it means to be free, we’ll be fighting a losing battle. When the government can compel you to buy something with coercive power, threatening your private property unless you comply, we are no longer the Republic we were created to be.

I don’t think this is lost on liberals; I don’t think they care. In virtually every debate I have with the left, they argue vehemently in favor of their own subjugation. A situation like this means there are few options left. But the last best hope is that people who believe in freedom and liberty decimate the ignorant (insane?) 30% in every election, from dog catcher to president.

Share

Comments

  1. I was listening to Mike Church the other day and Professor Gutzman said that even though King George imposed his will on the colonies, it was nothing like how our won government imposes its will on us.

  2. Hiya John – Funny…. when I first started writing this post, my original point was just that: Grievances against the King paled in comparison with what we have today. But as I thought about it and as I read and re-read each line in the Declaration, I was really struck by how SIMILAR the grievances are. Flip sides to the same coin, I suppose.

    There were a bunch of items in the Declaration… but the vast majority stemmed from taxation. All of the issues regarding the time and place of meetings, the King disallowing laws, enforcing others; all had to do with taxation.

    And the taxes?? The Stamp Act, Sugar Act, etc… I’d love to hear a James Otis speech after examining a modern-day pay stub. If all we ever had to do was pay a tax on printed materials, I think we’d all be pretty happy with that….

  3. yowrite man says:

    Just powers in who’s eye? Kings are quite wealthy, is that equated with our gov’t? Who’s got the power?

Trackbacks

  1. [...] ToBeRight: Grievances Against the King – Then and Now [...]

Speak Your Mind

*